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CUE SHEET WRITER
for Windows/NT/XP
User Manual
by
John & Karen Herr
(Dancing Penguins Software)
Version 2.1
Sept. 1, 1996
Copyright @1996
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1 What is CSW?
1.1 What CSW Can Do for You
1.2 What CSW Can NOT Do for You
1.3 CSW Features
1.4 Your CSW Package

2 Required Hardware and Software
2.1 Hardware/Software
2.2 Memory
2.3 Disk Space
2.4 Text Editor

3 Quick Intro to CSW for Windows

4 Using the Various Menu Items in CSW
4.1 File
4.2 Preferences
4.3 Cue-Editing
4.4 Cue-Validation
4.5 Cue-Selection
4.6 Build Dance
4.7 Help

5 Using the CSW ToolBar

6 Build a Dance File
6.1 Dance-File Commands
6.2 Dance-File Cues
6.3 Cue Formats
6.4 Left and Right Orientation of the Feet
6.5 Order of Commands and Cues
6.6 Using Part-Measure Cues
6.7 Mid-Measure Cues into Head-Cue Line (to Cue Sheet File)

7 Special Features (Positions, Directions, Comments, etc)
7.1 Usage of square brackets ( [, ] )
7.2 Usage of curly brackets ( { , } )
7.3 Usage of asterisks ( * )

8 Creating and Modifying Definition Files
8.1 Creating a New Definition-File
8.2 Rules for Creating or Modifying a Definition-File
8.3 A Few Definition-File ideas
8.4 Women's Steps in a Definition
8.5 Sample Definition-File

1.0 What is CSW?

1.1 What CSW Can Do for You
Cue Sheet Writer (CSW) is a windows-based computer program that reads a simple (unformatted/non-word processor) text file that contains your dance choreography and prints out a corresponding Cue Sheet. Below is a sample of an input file that would be converted into a Cue Sheet File, followed by a view of the corresponding resultant Cue Sheet File.

T=My Dance
H=Bill & Mary Jones, 1234 Long St, Big City, USA, 97531, 777-555-1234
H=Record: Collectibles 1234, "Dance to My Music", by Neil Saphire
H=Speed: 44 RPM Sequence: Intro AB AB End Rating: II Twostep
P=Intro
R=TS
wait 2;; apt pt; tog tch;
P=Part A
2 fwd 2stps;; box;;
P=Part B
1/2 box; scis thru {r};
P=End
apt pt
==

My Dance

Bill & Mary Jones, 1234 Long St, Big City, USA, 97531, 777-555-1234
Record: Collectibles 1234, "Dance to My Music", by Neil Saphire
Speed: 44 RPM Sequence: Intro AB AB End Rating: II Twostep

Intro
1-4   WAIT 2;; APT PT; TOG TCH;
1-4   wait 2 meas;; bk L, -, pt R, -; fwd R, -, tch L, -;

Part A
1-4   2 FWD 2STPS;; BOX;;
1-4   fwd L, cl R, fwd L, -; fwd R, cl L, fwd R, -; sd L, cl R, fwd L, -; sd R,
       cl L, bk R, -;

Part B
1-2   1/2 BOX; SCIS THRU;
1-2   sd L, cl R, fwd L, -; sd R, cl L, XRIFL, -;

End
1-1   APT PT;
1-1   bk L, -, pt R, -;


1.2 What CSW CANNNOT Do for You
1) CSW does not keep track of what foot you are on. It just finds the cue that you have entered and prints out the corresponding detailed step definitions in an easy-to-read format.
While the definition for "Maneuver" always starts on the same foot, the same is not true for cues like 'Scissors Thru' because 'Scissors Thru' can start on either foot. Therefore to accommodate this, CSW allows you to define a 'Scissors Thru L' and a 'Scissors Thru R'. Actually, if you wanted to use a "Left Maneuver", you could define such.

2) CSW does not handle dances that end their Parts off measure boundaries. In this case, special preparation is required. For example, if your dance has an Interlude with 2 1/2 measures, you can define the second measure as having 4 beats with a comment explaining the 2 beat extension.

1.3 CSW Features
Some of CSW's special features are listed below. More detailed and extended features will be specified throughout this manual.

1) Time savings: Type in your cues and CSW will find the step definitions and print them out for you. This will cut your work time by up to 80%.

2) New and modified cues: You can create new cues or modify existing ones to your own needs.

3) Measure counting: CSW will count the measures for you and will print sections of 4 measures at a time for ease of reading.

4) Rhythm changing: CSW has commands that will allow you to change rhythms within a dance.

5) Abbreviations/Definitions: For the most part, CSW follows ROUNDALAB's standard definitions and abbreviations, but allows you to change them.

6) 2 Output mediums: Your Cue Sheet will be written to a disk file, which you can subsequently modify within a text editor or within a Word Processor, prior to printing the Cue Sheet.

7) List Available Cues: If you don't remember the spelling of the cues, then you can list all the cues in a separate window, and you can also double click on a cue and its definition appears for your review.

8) Printer Compatibility: CSW works with most standard printers.

9) Notes: You can include comments and asterisked notes. The comments will not be passed through to the Cue Sheet, and the notes will be.

10) Multiple pages: CSW will automatically skip to the next page with the dance title and "(cont)" at the top.

11) When the Cue Sheet is created, the main ingredients of a Cue Card are also written to a file, which can be massaged within your favorite word processor to your preferred format.

1.4 Your CSW Package

This CSW Version 2.0 is for Windows, it is packaged with:
CSW.EXE The executable program
Definition Files (1 per rhythm): BO.DEF, CH.DEF, etc.
CSW.HLP Help File (this is for the on-line help)
MYDANCE.DNC Sample Dance-File


2.0 Required Hardware and Software

2.1 Hardware/Software
CSW runs on any PC with Windows, NT, or XP.

2.2 Memory
CSW uses a minimum of memory and therefore should run on most any minimum configured PC.

2.3 Disk Space
CSW uses a minimum of disk space. CSW will occupy less than 300K bytes. If you write 50 dances, you will need an additional 75K bytes (or less) of storage.

2.4 Text Editor
CSW allows you to type in your dance directly, or to copy and paste in your cues. You may also type in your dance into a text file (outside of CSW). If you do this, do not use a Word Processor, which embeds other special invisible characters into your file. You should use a simple editor. If you do use a Word Processor (such as Word or Word Perfect), then you will have to save your file in simple text format. The important thing is that CSW must have a clean file (one without any special embedded characters) to process.

3.0 Quick Intro to CSW for Windows
For those of you who do not want to read this entire manual before using CSW, follow these easy instructions:
1) Install CSW by copying all the files provided into any directory of your choice. If CSW came to you in a Zip'd file, then unzip it in that directory. Then run the program: CSW.EXE.
2) Select menu item: Build Dance | Edit/New Dance File This will bring up the "Build a Dance " window.
3) Then type in your dance, such as shown in Section 1.1 (What CSW Can Do for You):
4) Type in "new.dnc" in the Dance File edit box, and click on Save.
5) Type in "new.qs" into the Cue Sheet File edit box, and click on Generate. The Cue Sheet file is now generated into "new.qs". Exit the Build a Dance window.
6) Open the "new.qs" file under any editor or Word Processor, to reformat, add underlining, or whatever else you wish and re-save the file.
7) Use any Windows facility to print the Cue Sheet.

4.0 Using the Various Menu Items in CSW
When you first enter CSW, you will see the following menu:
   File Preferences Cue-Editing Cue-Validation Cue-Selection Build Dance Help
The following subsections describe the usage of each menu item.

4.1. File
The File menu includes:
View a File
Print
Print Setup
Exit

File | View a File
This submenu item will display the File View window. Select (or type in) a filename, and click on the Display File button. CSW will display the contents of the file for your viewing.

File | Print
This submenu item will ask you for the name of the Cue Sheet File that you want to print. It will normally be a .qs file. The Print function will use the spacing as defined under Preferences | Select Line Spacing to change the vertical spacing between lines.

File | Print Setup
This submenu item will allow you to change your printer destination.

File | Exit
This will exit the CSW program.

4.2 Preferences
The Preferences menu includes:
Preference Help
List Cues Alphabetically
Copy Cues Lowercase
Copy Cues Uppercase
Use Underlining/Bold Codes
Dont Use Underlining/Bold Codes
Select Line Spacing ...
ToolBar

Preferences | Preference Help
This will display Help information about all the Preference submenu items.

Preferences | List Cues Alphabetically
Preferences | List Cues by Phase
These submenu items allow you to toggle between two modes of displaying your cues from under the Cues-Selection menu. If you select one, the other will be de-selected. Listing Alphabetically is the default mode.

Listing Cues Alphabetically means that when you select Cues-Selection | , from the main CSW menu, the cues will list all the cues from the Definition-File alphabetically, without regard to phase or position within the .def file. Each P= comamnd within the .def file will be ignored in this mode.

Listing Cues by Phase means that the cues will be listed as they are read in from the Definition-File. Since the Definition-Files were delivered with the product by phase and alphabetcially within each phase, that is they way you will see them. If you change that order within the .def file, then you will see the new order. Each P= command within the .def file will also be shown prefixed and suffixed by asterisks.

Preferences | Copy Cues Lowercase

Preferences | Copy Cues Uppercase

These submenu items allow you to toggle between two modes of copying your cues from the Available Cue List window to the Build a Dance window. If you select one, the other will be de-selected. Copying in Lowercase is the default mode.

Copying in Lowercase means that when you copy a cue into your Build a Dance window, it will be copied in with conversion to lowercase letters.

Copying in Uppercase means that when you copy a cue into your Build a Dance window, it will be copied in with conversion to uppercase letters.

Preferences | Use Underlining/Bold Codes
Preferences | Dont Use Underlining/Bold Codes
These submenu items allow you to toggle between two modes of including or excluding format codes into the Cue Sheet File. If you select one, the other will be de-selected. Not using the Codes is the default mode.

Using the Codes means that when you Generate a Cue Sheet File from within the Build a Dance window or from the Generate Cue Sheet submenu item, that special control codes will be inserted into the file. This will cause the dance title to be bolded, and the head cues to be underlined.

Not using the Codes means that the printer control codes will not be inserted into the output file.

Preferences | Select Line Spacing
This submenu item allows you to change the vertical line spacing while printing your .qs file to the printer. A dialog box will be displayed, titled Cue Sheet Line Spacing. Entering '150' will yield minimal vertical spacing, and '500' will yield maximum spacing. '240' is the default value. This may be useful if you are trying to squeeze a Cue Sheet onto a paper that almost fits. You can reduce the spacing and then it can fit.

This may not work on some printers.

Preferences | ToolBar
This submenu item allows you to toggle between display (and not displaying) the toolbar. See the next section "Using the CSW ToolBar"

4.3 Cue-Editing
This menu includes a list of the current active rhythms, and an item that will display a dialog box, titled "Definition File Name". When you select a rhythm, CSW will read in the associated Defintion File and allow you to edit it. After editing, you can save it back to the same file, or to a new file name.

After a file has been edited, it is recommended that you check it for errors by selecting the corresponding Cue-Validation menu item.

4.4 Cue-Validation
This menu includes a list of the current active rhythms, and an item that will display a dialog box, titled "Definition File Name". When you select a rhythm, CSW will read in the associated Defintion File and check it for proper syntax. For more details, see Validating Definitions

4.5 Cue-Selection
This menu includes a list of the current active rhythms, and an item that will display a dialog box, titled "Definition File Name". When you type in the file name, CSW will display all the cues from the associated Definition File in a window of the "Available Cue List" dialog box. Also see Available Cues List

4.6 Build Dance
The Build Dance menu includes:
Edit / New Dance File
Generate Cue Sheet
Look at Cue Sheet
Build Dance | Edit / New Dance File
This submenu item brings up the "Build a Dance" dialog box. With this dialog box, you can load a Dance-File into a viewing window, change it as desired, and save it. You can also convert it into a Cue Sheet File.

Build Dance | Generate Cue Sheet
This submenu item brings up the "Generate a Cue Sheet" dialog box which allows you to enter the input Dance- File and the output Cue Sheet File name and cause the Generation from one to the other. It is a short-cut version of the "Build a Dance" dialog box.

Build Dance | Look at Cue Sheet
This submenu item will display the File View window. Select (or type in) the name of your Cue Sheet file (or any other file), and click on the Display File button. CSW will display the contents of the file for your viewing.
Also see Build a Dance

4.7 Help
The Help menu includes:
CSW Manual
Errors
Index
About CSW
Help | CSW Manual
This submenu item displays the menu you are now reading.

Help | Errors
This submenu item displays the error numbers, along with their associate error description, and the probable resolution.

Help | Index
This submenu item displays the help file index that lists all of the available help items. See CSW Index

Help | About CSW
This submenu item displays the 'About' box that names the CSW program and specifies its version number, version date, and the copyright declaration.

5.0 Using the CSW Tool Bar
The Tool Bar is the set of buttons that are directly under the Menu Bar.
The usage of each button on the Tool Bar is described below.

1) Cue Button (with the letters CUs)
This button will ask you which definition-file you want to view. You must type in the file name (e.g. CH.DEF), and then when you clikc the Accept button, the list of cues in that file will be displayed.
2) Dance Button (with the letters DNc)
This button will bring up the Build a Dance window, where you can insert your dance information and cues.
3) Generate Button (with the letters GEn)
This button will bring up a window for your to input the name of your dance file (.DNC) and the name of the file where the generated Cue Sheet is supossed to go (.QS). Then click on Generate and the Cue Sheet will be generated.
4) Print Button (with the letters Pr)
This button will ask you for the name of your generated .QS file, for printing.
5) Help Button (with the question mark)
This will bring up the on-line help file.
6) Index Button (with the letters INX)
This will bring up an index that you can click on to get specific information.
6.0 Build a Dance-File (Input to CSW)
A Dance-File is a file that contains the cues (and commands) that define a dance (See Section 1.1). CSW will read and convert these cues into the final Cue Sheet file (see Section 1.1). You may create the Dance-File from within the Build a Dance window, or in a simple text editor.
In the following subsections, we will present the CSW commands and cues that you will enter into your Dance-File. Next, we will discuss the proper order in which to enter the commands. Last, a special discussion on cues that don't fall on measure boundaries will be provided.

6.1 Dance-File Commands
The Dance-File may have the following commands, which are described in the following subsections:
1) T= Title Command
2) H= Header Command
3) R= Rhythm Command
4) P= Part Command
5) C= Comment Command
6) N= Note Command
7) == End of Text Command

All '=' commands should start in column 1 of the line, with the '=' in column 2, and no space immediately after the '='.
Blank (empty) lines are permissible in the Dance-File.

T= or t= (Title Command)
This command tells CSW the title of the dance (or dance name). By entering "T=My Dance", CSW will center-print the title at the top of the Cue Sheet page. This command must be present and must be the first line in your Cue-File. Upper and lower case is permissible. See example in Figure 1-1.

H= or h= (Header Command)
This command tells CSW to save and print the associated information as part of the Cue Sheet header information. You may enter up to 6 'H=' command lines. Upper and lower case is permissible. See example in Figure 1-1. Each line can contain no more than 78 characters, including spaces.

R= or r= (Rhythm Selection Command)
This command tells CSW to change the current Rhythm. There should be only 2 characters to the right of the equal sign. These 2 characters represent a rhythm. And, these 2 letters are used in the name of the Definition Files (e.g. RB.DEF, FX.DEF, etc.). Below are some standard rhythms included within CSW. See all the rhythms available to you, select Cue-Selection on the Menu Bar of CSW.
RB means Rumba
CH means Cha
FX means Foxtrot
JT means Jive Triple
TS means Twostep
WZ means Waltz

The R= command should be entered prior to its associated cue(s) within the Dance-File. For example, to switch from Twostep to Rumba and back, see the following:
R=TS
circ wy/tog; fc-fc bk-bk;
R=RB
box;
R=ts
2 fwd 2stps;

Note: Upper and lower case is permissible.

P= or p= (Part Comamnd)
This command tells CSW to start a new Part. A Part may be an Intro, interlude, tag, ending, or whatever you want to call it. Any number of parts are permissible. (See Figure 1-1). Upper and lower case is permissible.

C= (Comment Command)
This command tells CSW that the associated line is a comment. This comment is relative to the Dance-File and will not be copied to the Cue Sheet. Its purpose is to add comments into your Dance-File without affecting anything. If your comment is longer than one line, then use multiple C= commands, such as:
C= The following sequence of figures are a direct
C= copy from Part B of the dance "My Dance"

N= (Note Command)
This command is used to add special notes or comments to the Cue Sheet. All N= command lines that are placed after a P= command will be gathered and saved until another P= command is encountered. All the gathered notes will be printed on the Cue Sheet at the end of the associated Part. For example, given:
P=Part A
N=This is comment 1
2fwd 2s; box; fc-fc; bk-bk;
N=This is comment 2
box;
P=Part B
N=This is comment 3
Comments 1 and 2 will be printed at the end of Part A, and Comment 3 will be printed at the end of Part B.

Notes may be either independent (stands alone at the end of a Part) or dependent. ( tied to a prior reference).

Independent Notes The example above shows independent notes as there are no ties or references.

Dependent Notes
To create a referencing note, insert one or more asterisks ("*") anywhere within the associated Part. command, and match it with an N= command, like the following:
P=Part B (*Foxtrot)
3stp; **fwd run 2; rvs trns;
N=* Part B has faster music and will feel like Quickstep
N=**This is a 3stp on the other foot
P=Part C

CSW will ignore any asterisks while processing a Dance-File for cue matching against the Definition-File. But, it will pass the them on to the Cue Sheet.

== (End of Text Command)
This command tells CSW that there are no more cues or commands in the file. If there is anything in the file following the == command, it will be ignored.

6.2 Dance-File Cues
Cues may be entered one per line, such as:
box;;
fc-fc;
bk-bk;
box;;
circ wy/tog;;

or they may be grouped on lines, such as:
box;; fc-fc; bk-bk;
box;; circ wy/tog;;
You must use semi-colons to separate each cue. You do not need to concern yourself with the number of semicolons that follow a cue since CSW will actually calculate the number of measures for you regardless of the number of semicolons you type in. Also, you do not need to enter any semicolons at the end of a line. For example, the following is equivalent to the last example above:

box; fc-fc;;;;;;; bk-bk
box;;;; circ wy/tog

When you type in cues into your Dance-File, you must match the cue spellings that exist in your Definition-Files. To check the spelling of a cue, you may display the cues simultaneously while you are building the dance. You may also print out the Definition-File for referencing. You can find the Definition-Files within CSW's directory. Their filenames end with ".DEF". Be careful not to accidently alter the files while examining them.

Cues may be in upper and lower case, such as:
Box; FC-FC; bK-bK;
box; CIRC wy/tog;

6.3 Cue Formats (in Dance-Files)
Pre-fixes & Suffixes
It is often desirable to add directions or postions (or whatever else) to a cue. When comparing your input cues against the Definition-Files, CSW will ignore anything it finds within square brackets. For example, you can enter such cues as:
2 fwd 2s [To FC]
[CP WALL] box

Embedded Spaces and Blank Lines
You may preceed a cue with spaces. You may append a cue with spaces. And you may insert multiple spaces between words in a cue. CSW drops leading and trailing spaces and shrinks internal multiple spaces to single spaces, and ignores blank lines (carriage return only).

Embedded Special Characters ("[", "]", "{", "}", and "*") Square and Curly Brackets, and Asterisks are processed in a special manner. Their usage is explained in section "Special Features". The important formatting consideration is that when brackets (with their contents) are excluded or included, you need to remember that there may be extra or missing spaces after the exclusion or inclusion, and this could affect the result.

Square Bracket Example: Be careful to take into account the spaces between words. For example, if you enter:
bo [Hi There]x;
CSW will drop the brackets and their content. Then it will combine the 2 spaces into a single space. The result will be: "bo x;" with a space in the middle of the cue, making the cue unrecognizable. The following would work:
bo[Hi There]x;

Curly Bracket Example: If the Definition-File has the entry:
SCIS THRU R
And you enter the following in your Dance-File

Scis Thru{R}
CSW will drop the curly brackets and use "Scis ThruR" with no space between "Thru" and "R". Therefore, CSW will not find a match because the Definition-File has a space between "Thru" and "R". To make it work, you need to enter
Scis Thru {R}

6.4 Left and Right Orientation of the Feet
Some figures, such as "Maneuver Side Close", always use the same feet. Other figures such as "Scissors Thru", may start on either the left foot or the right foot.. CSW's solution is to provide two cues, one for the starting of either foot. For example, CSW provides "Scissors Thru" (for starting with the left foot) and "Scissors Thru R" (for starting with the right foot).

But, what if you don't want the Cue Sheet head cues to read as "SCIS THRU R"? CSW allows you to use curly brackets in your cues to eliminate the undesireable parts of cues. For example, in your Dance-File, type in "Scissors Thru {R}". CSW will use "Scissors Thru R" to search for the cue in the Definition-File, but it will not print the part within in the brackets to the Cue Sheet, which will show "Scissors Thru". (See section "Special Features")

6.5 Order of Commands and Cues (in Dance-Files)
The normal order of commands is as follows:

T= Must be first line in the file
H= A maximum of 6 lines, and up to 78 characters each
R= Must preceed each cue using this rhythm until the rhythm changes with another R= command
P= Must preceed cues that make up the Part
This command must follow the T=, and H= commands The first cue must be preceeded by a P= command
N= Should exist within the Part with which they are related

C= May exist anywhere in the file
== Must be the last line in the file

6.6 Using Part-Measure Cues (in Dance-Files)
Many cues do not finish on measure boundaries, especially in Jive. It is permissible to use cues that end mid-measure, but part-measure cues must end on a measure boundary at the end of a Part.

For example (illegal):
R=JT
P=Part A
bas rk; kckbchg 2x; prog rk;
Basic Rock ends mid measure, and the next 2 cues perpetuate mid-measure terminations. Therefore, the Part ends mid-measure.

Next example (legal):
R=JT
P=Part A
bas rk; kckbchg 2x; bas rk;
Although the kckbchg 2x ends mid measure, the 2nd Basic Rock ends on a measure boundary.

6.7 Mid-Measure Cues into Head-Cue Line (to Cue Sheet File)
When CSW encounters a cue that ends mid-measure, it continues to combine subsequent cues until a cue is found that ends on a measure boundary. Cues that end mid-measure are combined with the next cue with an ampersand concatenator. For example, if the Dance-File contains:
R=JT
P=Part A;
R trng falwy; R trng falwy; kckbchg 2x;
L trng falwy; kckbchg 2x; L trng falwy;

The resultant HEAD-CUE line (in the Cue Sheet) will be:
1-8 R TRNG FALWY & R TRNG FALWY;;; KCKBCHG 2X; L TRNG FALWY & KBC 2X & L TRNG FALWY;;;;

Notice that the ampersand combined 2 Right Turning Fallaways and ended with 3 semicolons. The kckbchg 2x between the Left Turning Falaways was included with the ampersands because it also ended mid-measure. And finally, note that CSW added up the 3 cues to produce 4 semicolons at the end.

7.0 Special Features (Positions, Directions, Comments, etc)
This section explain the usage of special characters within your Dance-File.
7.1 Usage of Square Brackets ("[" and "]")
The square brackets tell CSW to ignore the enclosed characters while comparing your Dance-File cue with the Definition-File cue, but to print the square brackets with their content to the Cue Sheet File.
For example, CSW will convert
[BFLY] box;
to:
box
before seaching the Definition-File for "box". Then CSW will print "[BFLY] BOX" to the Cue Sheet.

The square brackets can be usefull for adding any kind of short term or comment that will be transferred to the Cue Sheet. If your comment is lengthy, it would probably be better to use an askterisk within the cue (see section "Usage of Asterisks" below) with an associated N= command.

Lets take the example that you want the positions and directions identified in the header-cues, but you don't care if that detail is copied into the step details below.

Example, if you enter into your Dance-File:

P=Part A
[SCP] 2 fwd 2stps [TO FC]; Box
the following will result in your Cue Sheet File:
Part A
1-4 [SCP] 2 FWD 2STPS [TO FC]:; BOX;;
1-4 fwd L, cl R, fwd L, -; fwd R, cl L, fwd R, -; sd L, cl R, fwd L, -;
sd R, cl L, bk R, -;

If you want the positions and directions included into the step details, then change the cue definitions within the associated Definition-File.

Example, if you change a cue definition within your Definition-File:
from 2 FWD 2STPS: ......
to SCP 2 FWD 2STPS TO FC: .....
then you have to enter in your Dance-File:
P=Part A
scp 2 fwd 2stps; Box;
which would produce in your Cue Sheet File:
Part A
1-4 SCP 2 FWD 2STPS TO FC;; BOX;;
1-4 fwd L, cl R, fwd L, -; fwd R, cl L, fwd R, -; sd L, cl R, fwd L, -;
sd R, cl L, bk R, -;

7.2 Usage of Curly Brackets ("{" and "}")
The curly brackets tell CSW to use the enclosed characters while comparing the Dance-File cue with the Definition-File cue, but to not print the curly brackets or their contents to the Cue Sheet.

For example, CSW will convert the Dance-File cue
scis thru {r}
to:
scis thru r
before searching the Definition-File for "scis thru r". Then CSW will print "SCIS THRU" to the Cue Sheet File.

7.3 Usage of Asterisks ("*")
CSW ignores asterisks that it finds associated with a cue in your Dance-File while comparing your Dance-File cue against the Defintion-File cues. When CSW writes out the Cue Sheet, it will include the asterisks.

Within a P= command, or within an N= command, an asterisk is treated just as any other character within the associated text, and will be printed to the Cue Sheet File.

The primary usage of asterisks is shown in the following example:
If you enter into your Dance-File:
P=Part B*
fc-fc; box {r}**;
N=* Part B music is slower than Part A and should be done with no hands joined
N=** This figure should be done in a bk to bk position, starting with the trail feet.
the result in your Cue Sheet File would be:
Part B*
1-3 FC-FC; BOX**;;
1-3 sd L, cl R, sd L trng LF 1/2, -; sd R, cl L, fwd R, -; sd L, cl R, bk L, -;
* Part B music is slower than Part A and should be done with no hands joined
** This figure should be done in a bk to bk position, starting with the trail feet.

8 Creating and Modifying Definition-Files
A Definition-File contains the detailed step defintions for the cues that are typed into a Dance-File.

8.1 Creating a New Definition-File

8.1.1 Creating a file
Use a simple editor (one that does not insert special characters into the text) to build your Definition-File. Give the file any 2-character name, followed by the file extension ".DEF". Be careful not to choose filenames that are the same as those that came with your CSW package. You may want to compare against the recommended abbreviations found under Rhythm Abbreviation in Definitions .

The file names provided with CSW can be found in Version Descriptions .

CSW cue definitions and commands that may be used within a Definition-File are as follows:
1) M= Defines number of beats/comas per measure
2) C= Comment line
3) P= Defines Phase
4) Cue definitions
5) == End of Text indicator
See the section "Rules for Creating or Modifying an Existing Definition-File" for rules on the ordering of these cue definitions and commands.

8.1.2 M= or m= (Measure Command)
The M= command tells CSW how many beats/comas make up a measure for all the cue definitions in the file. This command should preceed any cue defintions in the file. Legal entries are: M=3 or M=4. Otherwise an error will be given.

8.1.3 C= or c= (Comment Command)
The C= command is the comment command. The C= command may exist on any line within the Definition-File. If your comment is longer than 1 line, then use repeated C= commands:

C= This file contains the definition for
C= the new rhythm 'Bolero'.

8.1.4 P= or p= (Phase Command)
The P= command causes its associated text to be displayed in the Available Cues List window when the preference "List Cues by Phase" is selected. This command should preceed any associated group of definitions. For example: in the WZ.DEF file we could have:
C= This is the Waltz Definition-File (WZ.DEF)
M=3
P=Phase II
BOX:fwd L,sd R,cl L;bk R,sd L,cl R;
more Phase II definitions
P= Phase III
BK BK LK BK:bk L, bk R/bk L, bk R;
more Phase III definitions
When you select a submenu item under Cues, CSW will read in all the cues in the associated Defintion-File (.DEF) and display them in the Available Cues List window.

If preference "List Cues by Phase" is selected, the P= text lines will also be listed in the window in the order they are found in the file.

If preference "List Cues Alphabetically" is selected, all the cues will be sorted and displayed. The P= text lines will be ignored.

8.1.5
The cue definition line contains a cue and the definition for that cue, separated by a colon (:), such as the following definition for the cue "box":
BOX:sd L,cl R,fwd L,-;sd R,cl L,bk R,-;

You may change the definition, but be careful to adhere to the rules that are listed under section "Rules for Creating or Modifying an Existing Definition-File".

8.1.6 == (End of Text Command)
The == command tells CSW that this line is the last line in the Definition-File and to stop processing. Therefore, it should be the last line in the file, unless you want to type in some text lines after the == line. These text lines will be totally ignored.

8.2 Rules for Creating or Modifying a Definition-File
You may modify an existing Definition-File, but it is strongly recommended that you make a copy of the file and save it somewhere before you modify it. In creating or modifying a file, remember the following:

General rules for cue definitions in a Definition-File:
1) The entire definition must be on a single line (no embedded carriage returns),
2) Cues should be in upper case,
3) Cues should be separated from its definition by a colon (:)
4) no spaces between punctuation, no leading spaces, no trailing
spaces, and no multiple spaces internally (This is not required, but recommended because it makes the Cue Sheet much more readable)
5) Definitions may contain either comas or semicolons - they are the same to CSW, and CSW will convert every one to a coma as it reads in the definition, and convert the appropriate comas to semicolon just before writing out to the Cue Sheet File.

Ordering rules within a Definition-File:
1) M= Should be found prior to the cue definitions
2) C= May be found anywhere in the file
3) P= Should preceed its associated cue definitions
4) Must preceed its associated
5) == Must be the last command in the file and must be
found after the last cue definition in the file
6) The first 2 characters of each command (namely M=, C=, R=, and == ) must occupy characters 1 and 2 of the line. .Also, the commands may be in lower case.

8.3 A Few Definition-File ideas
Following an example of the need to create a new Definition-File:

You want to use the existing TS.DEF file, and you want to change the defintions for some cues, but you don't want to lose the old definitions.

To do this, copy the TS.DEF file over to a new file called TX.DEF. Under the editor, within TX.DEF, change the definitions of 2 FWD 2STPS and BOX . Next, drop out all the rest of the definitions in TX.DEF (the ones that you didn't change). Then in your Dance-File, you can type in cues using both Definition-Files, such as:
R=TS;
2 fwd 2stps; htch 6;
R=TX;
2 fwd 2stps; box;
R=TS;
2 fwd 2stps; strut 4;

Using this same technique, you could keep a file of all the unusual cues separately.

Also, you could create a new rhythm (say 5-count), in a new file (say FC.DEF).

In summary, there are many ways of making/changing Definition-Files, including:
1) Edit the existing definition(s) in an existing Definition-File.
2) Define new cue(s) and add into an existing Definition-File.
HITCH BOX:sd & fwd L, . . .
RUNNING BOX:fwd L, . . .
3) If you want different versions of the same cue, then make multiple definitions, each cue being slightly different, like:
BOX A:fwd & sd L, . . .
BOX B :sd & fwd L, . . .
BOX C:fwd L, . . .
Then use the curly brackets to select out the one you want from your Dance-File. (e.g. box {B}; )
4) Copy an existing Definition-File to a new file. Change the new file to your liking. Then you may use R= commands to reference either or both files.
5) Create a new Definition-File, say "QQ.DEF". Add definitions into it. Then use matching R=QQ commands in your Definition-File and in the Dance-File.

8.4 Women's Steps in a Definition
A cue definition in a Definition-File may include the women's steps also. They must be included within parentheses, like "(W RF trn)". Since CSW counts comas after reading in a cue definition from a Definition-File, the comas for the women's steps could make the count incorrect. Therefore, CSW ignores all comas and semicolons found within the parentheses. This means that you can include the women's step anywhere in the definition.

The Definition-File cue definitions included with CSW follow these rules.
1) When all the women's steps for an entire measure are to be shown together, then her steps are included within a single set of parentheses just before the semicolon, such as:
1/2 BOX:sd L,cl R,fwd L,-(W sd R,cl L,bk R,-);
2) When each women's step are relative to a single beat of a measure, then her step is shown in parentheses just before each coma. This may mean that not every step has a womens description. For example:
HTCH/SCIS: bk R (W bk L comm LF trn),cl L,fwd R to BJO (W fin trn XLIBR),-;
It is also permissible, where necessary, to use different rules such as embedding the womens step in the middle of a mans definition such as:
ROLL 3:trng LF (W RF) fwd L, cont trn sd & bk R, sd & fwd L;

8.5 Sample Definition-File
Figure 8-1 shows a simple sample of a Definition-File, named TS.DEF (Twostep):
Figure 8-1
M=4
P= Phase II
1/2 BOX FWD:sdL,cl R,fwd L,-;
1/2 BOX BK:sd R,cl L, bk R,-;
APT PT:bk L,-,pt R,-;
2 SD CL:sd L,cl R,sd L,cl R;

...
WAIT 1:wait 1 meas,,,;
WAIT 2:wait 2 meas,,,;,,,;
...
P= Phase III
FWD STAIRS 8:fwd L,cl R,sd L,cl R;fwd L,cl R,sd L,cl R;
...
==